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'Baaghi' review: All Action, No Reaction!

'Baaghi' review: All Action, No Reaction!

Source: Sify

By: Sonia Chopra

Friday 29 April 2016

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Movie Title

Baaghi: A Rebel For Love

Director

Sabir Khan

Star Cast

Shraddha Kapoor, Tiger Shroff

Striking action set-pieces, Kerala tourism shots, a hero that can really fight, a fetching heroine—and there you go, you have a movie!

Here, the Baaghi is Ronnie (Tiger Shroff) whose father packs him off to Kerala to a Kalaripayattu institute run by a close friend. 'My son is a rebel, a baaghi. Please set him right! Make him a human-being!' pleads the letter by the father.

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The head of the institute is clad in a martial-arts costume that does not seem traditional Kalaripayattu. But then, this is a movie where a tragic death is shown by interspersing the struggling-for-breath character with close-ups of a Kathakali dance act. Complaining that it is out-of-context or pointing that this is a glaring disrespect for the classical dance is futile. The there is that song where the two lead actors romance against a backdrop of baffled elephants made to stand in the water with their mahouts.

Ronnie has a meet-cute with Sia (Shraddha Kapoor) who has a tendency of talking aloud. When they meet, she's looking at the sky, proclaiming, "I'm not going to talk to you" (to the clouds, we're assuming) when it abruptly stops raining. Basically, Shraddha Kapoor plays the love interest—refusing to act her age, completely devoid of personality or life-goals, existing to dance in the rain and provide the romantic angle.

Villain Raghav (Sudheer Babu) is the institute head's son. He too falls for Sia. Overnight, he turns from devoted son to Raavan. And then starts a modern Ramayan in the guise of being the tale of a rebel.

For a film titled Baaghi, the central character doesn't really strike one as a rebel. There's nothing revolutionary about him or his life. He's, at best, a spoilt overgrown kid, and a bit of a drifter.

Tiger Shroff, who bears a striking resemblance to Hrithik Roshan in the movie, is a superb entertainer. But an actor, he is not! He comes alive in the action scenes, punching and kicking with devotion. But he's not at home when it comes to the actual acting.

Sudheer Babu is barely menacing in a role, which is seriously devious. Shraddha Kapoor is the only one acting in the film; but then, she's handed such a boring role. The kind of insipid role that heroines have been playing since decades.

Director Sabbir Khan (Heropanti, Kambakkht Ishq) is not a fan of subtlety. So everything is loud and over-the-top. He uses flashbacks, in case we've forgotten a character's motivations. During a fight, we are shown coloured x-ray visions of bones breaking, in case we didn't get that from the actor's expressions. The action is interesting in parts, but gets repetitive. And it's set to annoying video-game type music. Really, there's not a moment of silence in the film!

Cinematographer Binod Pradhan swoops in to save the day, capturing Kerala in all its splendor. And then there is the martial-arts infused action. These are the only two things worthwhile in the movie.

Baaghi review: 1.5 stars