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Entertainment review: Akshay's latest is anything but

Movie:
Entertainment
Director:
Sajid-Farhad
Cast:
Akshay Kumar,
Tammannaah,
Praksh Raj,
Sonu Sood,
Krushna Abhishek,
Avg user rating:

What happens when a man working three jobs to sustain his hospitalized father and unable to win over his girlfriend's greedy dad, suddenly comes into inherited money?

And what happens when the road to that 3000 crore has one unlikely hitch - a cute Golden Retriever named Entertainment.

Akshay Kumar plays this extremely lucky and equally unfortunate person who, due to a clause in a will, is reduced to looking after the dog, now the technical owner of the mansion and moneys.

Greed makes him hatch a plan to eliminate the dog, while two villains (Prakash Raj and Sonu Sood) just out from jail, set their eyes on the inheritance. The film then takes a predictable route where the right person finally nails the inheritance.

Now this is a film far, far away from reality. Everyone speaks the same way, with each dialogue ODing on word play. Out of about 100 lines, maybe two are funny. The rest you have to endure.

The film doesn't leave out a single punny opportunity relating to canines. So the characters keep saying that the dog will die a "kutte ki maut". Akshay asks a German Shepherd if it's even been to Germany; the song 'Who Let the Dogs Out' plays in the background.

Other dialogue uses names of films and actors to make a point. Here's a sample?"Humein nana patkar mat kehna, tum hi hamaari asha bhonsle ho." The lame ones include, "Hamari Ekta mein hi humein Shobha Deti Hai" and "I Rajni can?t believe this."

Then, there is word-play between unrelated words like sympathy and sampatti, mention and mansion and so on. DNA becomes 'Daddy's Naajayaz Aulaad'.

Now, all this is fine, as long the film is not a ?family movie?. There is an entire portion in the first half where two characters are trying to murder the dog using a book '50 Ways to Kill By Accident' (shown in a very Home Alone manner). One wonders if that's too dark for kids (they try electric shocks, poison, sabotage etc), even if the dog outsmarts them.

Their idea of employing the same girl to seduce the two villainous brothers is so old school, and again inappropriate for kids. One brother says a woman is attractive when she's all timid in a sari; the other feels a woman should be "sexy and seductive" (one piece item in two piece bikini) and claims to be in love with a "36-24-36". The regressive dialogue makes you wince.

Other "comedy" includes a dog returning from the grave with red eyes, to spook someone. The other recurring joke is everyone mispronouncing the name Habibullah.

The embarrassing second half meanders on, trying hard to be funny, now punning on names of the actors themselves. Faux sentimentality is introduced with a character having an elongated emotional monologue with an unconscious dog (with a portion of happy flashbacks). The result of the monologue is the stuff of '80s melodramatic movies. You get the drift.

The commercially successful writer team of Sajid-Farhad (Bol Bachchan, Chennai Express) is back and Entertainment marks their directorial debut. The style is the same -- everyone speaks in rhymes, there are stray (pun unintended) amusing moments, crass dialogue is a given, and subtlety is a crime!

Akshay Kumar is first-rate, even while mouthing dialogue like, "Woh kutta nahin, bhai hai mera." The dog's cute too, and would have been a huge draw for the kiddie audience, if the makers had not made such a below-par film.

Tamannah Bhatia yet again plays the pretty love-interest with nothing much to do. She has zero say in her marriage, and is controlled by her gold-digger dad. Prakash Raj?s dark complexion is made fun of; Sonu Sood has a dog bite his privates. Krushna Abhishek reprises his Bol Bachchan act.

Disappointingly regressive and only sparsely funny, the only entertainment comes from the portions involving the dog. One wishes the film lived up to its name!

Rating: One and a half stars

 

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