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Golmaal 3 review: A sparkling performance

Movie:
Golmaal 3
Director:
Rohit Shetty
Cast:
Ajay Devgn, Kareena Kapoor, Tusshar Kapoor, Shreyas Talpade, Arshad Warsi, Kunal Khemu, Mithun Chakraborty
Avg user rating:
The third part of the Golmaal franchise, right on time two years after Golmaal Returns, manoeuvres 10 characters all set in Goa.

We meet Pritam (Mithun Chakraborty), his three idiots for sons, and their current scam involving fake history exam papers. When Pritam reprimands them for selling fake papers to unsuspecting students, the smart-alecky one (Madhav, played by Arshad Warsi) says that this will teach the students never to take short-cuts.

You break into a smile despite yourself. The other two brothers - Lucky (Tusshar Kapoor, doing his annoying mute act) and Laxman (Kunal Khemu) - are his helpers in executing the scams.

Not too far away, brothers Gopal (Ajay Devgn) and Laxman (Shreyas Talpade) with friend Daboo (Kareena) run a water-rides business. Their first altercation with Madhav and gang happens when they, too, start the same business on the beach.

Gopal smashes fingers (it’s an ongoing joke), Daboo gives gaalis no one can decipher, Shreyas’s character stammers while Tusshar’s character shrieks his ‘a-i-o’ language.

So the warring groups hate each other, but a love story is brewing between the two homes. Mithun’s character meets his long-lost love Guddi (Ratna Pathak-Shah) who is now mother to Gopal.

But while Daboo insists the two finally get married, their sons are dead against the idea.

The film has a whiff of Basu Chaterjee’s Khatta Meetha mixed with the requisite madness of the Golmaal series. So each star’s entry is atop a moving vehicle, there’s plenty of action complete with shattering glass and smashed vehicles, random shots of girls in bikins, and at least two jokes that’ll crack you up or gross you out depending on your sensibilities.

Now for the dialogue: the humour takes getting used to. It’s not downright funny, and relying more on word-play doesn’t always work. Here’s a sample: Daboo says when faced with her business rivals, “Take is easy? Cheesy log hain yeh.”

Non-central characters turn out to be the most entertaining. Objectionably, the two groups nonchalantly take their financing for new businesses from the local bhais. These local dons are shown to be bumbling fools.

One named Vasooli (Mukesh Tiwari) is constantly love-struck and fooled by Gopal and gang. The other one, Puppy Bhai (Johnny Lever) suffers from a strange condition where he keeps losing and regaining his memory; and also mysteriously embodies several different characters.

Lever is fabulous playing this character that brings on the most laughs. So at one moment he is a ‘chor’, at another moment he mistakes Gopal for a bus conductor asking him for a ticket to Pandharpur.

The most fun portions are where the film spoofs the retro era complete with a flashback-ed love story of Pritam and Guddi, complete with Mithun doing an I am a Disco Dancer performance.

His ‘70s style altercation with the girl’s dad who lives in a mansion (with a life-size faux tiger) is hilarious. Employing ‘70s hit numbers is a masterstroke and great fun.

On the downside, the constant hammering of insults to mothers in the form of maa gaalis is jarring. The Golmaal series has evolved from the first film (this time, women are not referred to as ‘item’, thank god), but each dialogue peppered with a “teri maa ki” is just not done.

Director Rohit Shetty (Golmaal Returns, Golmaal, All the Best) makes a film that’s entertaining for the most part. The end is so abrupt and such a pat on the back by the filmmaker, it’s sorely disappointing.

A sparkling performance by the cast is the highlight. Worth a watch for the ‘rewind’ portions and a few real laughs, even though sparse.

Rating: 2.5 stars

 

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