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Heropanti review: Tiger's 'hero' is quite the wannabe

Movie:
Heropanti
Director:
Sabbir Khan
Cast:
Tiger Shroff, Kriti Sanon, Sandeepa Dha, Vikram Singh
Avg user rating:

Remade from the Telugu Parugu, Heropanti is an excruciating 140 minute journey about a young man who wants to win the heroine's daddy's heart. Yup, you read that right. The asli hero isn't a young man who runs away with the girl of his dreams any more. He's the young man who moves mountains to reach the happy ending with her father's permission, never mind that the latter is a gun-wielding, goon-commanding scary fellow who doesn't mind a good honour killing if the occasion demands it.

The Choudhry clan is in uproar. The eldest daughter, Renu (Sandeepa Dhar), has eloped with her boyfriend right in the middle of her shaadi. As any Jat father worth his salt ought to do, Choudhry (Prakash Raj) unleashes a bunch of nincompoop goons to find her whereabouts. The goons round up four guys, one of whom is Babloo (Tiger Shroff), an army by himself, we're told.

Babloo knows where the couple is but he will not reveal the secret because he's macho like that. Besides being a terrific friend, of course. The friends somehow escape from the shed they are locked in and are about to leap on to a train that will take them away from this rogue-infested place but wait... Babloo suddenly doesn't want to leave. And why is that? He's just seen the girl of his dreams! The same girl he once saw and lost his heart to, so much so that he walks around with her lost earring everywhere. In true Bollywood style, Babloo has no idea who she is or what she's like (apart from the fact that she eats pani-puri orgasmically).

As luck would have it, the girl, Dimpy (Kriti Sanon), is none other than Choudhry's younger daughter. And so, Babloo decides to stick around, giving his hapless friends no choice. Pretty soon, Dimpy comes around but Babloo's ideas about love, elopement, and other such philosophical matters have gone through a radical change. He has, after all, spent a lot of time in the company of Choudhry and seen his paternal angst up close.

Prakash Raj, who has played all kinds of fathers and all kinds of villains, is the saving grace of the film. He gives a credible performance as the izzat-loving yet caring father, exploding and emoting with equal ease. It's obvious that Tiger Shroff has worked very hard to achieve the kind of body he has (and we're never allowed to forget that, thanks to his habit of taking his shirt off at regular intervals) but he could improve a lot in the acting department. All his lines sound the same, with no inflection of tone whatsoever. His smile is all right, but can we see some other expressions, please? Kriti Sanon doesn't have much to do in the film other than praying and being the good Indian girl, so it's hard to judge her performance. One has to give it to her for dancing around in barely-there sarees and cholis on snow-covered mountains though. That does require some himmat.

The music is good enough to sustain the vapid and often illogical script and the songs flit past without grating on your nerves too much. In its defence, Heropanti could claim that it's a time-pass movie but personally, one can think of a number of better ways to pass the hours. Staring at the walls, included. Making a good time-pass movie, even if it is a formulaic one, requires some amount of intelligent scripting and execution. This hero, far from being original, is quite the wannabe.

Verdict: Time-pass, if you are desperate enough.

 

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