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Bittoo Boss review: Easy, breezy watch!

Bittoo Boss review: Easy, breezy watch!

Source: Sify

By: Sonia Chopra

Critic's Rating: 17/5

Thursday 12 April 2012

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Movie Title

Bittoo Boss

Director

Supavitra Babul

Star Cast

Pulkit Samrat, Amita Pathak

Since we are in Punjab, the film is (expectedly) peppered with local language quirks. Bread pakode ki kasam, it's an instant reminder to the language of the adorable twosome in Band Baaja Baaraat. That the two films are about weddings is another similarity.

But that's where the likeness ends (Band Baaja... was a far more accomplished and self-assured attempt). Bittoo Boss (Pulkit Samrat) is a wedding videographer nursing a crush on golgappa-loving Mrinalini (Amita Pathak) who has done an "MBA from Chandigarh" but has zero professional aims.

The pure soul that he is, Bittoo is unaware of the ways of the world. Which, his girlfriend explains, is having to take nonsense from important people to make it big.

Bittoo Boss, taking his last name seriously, refuses to bow down to anybody. Calling himself a kalaakar (artist), he is certain he'll become successful on his own terms. He's also naive enough to gift his ladylove a cover for her scooter as a romantic gift.

But at one point, Bittoo succumbs to the money lure, and makes a switch from wedding videos to "honeymoon" videos.

The dialogue is entertaining but overwritten. Very few people would actually say an artificial line like, "Aap aise bhaag rahe ho, jaise golgappon ki sale lagi hai." Then you have a "Come Sweety, Go Beauty" written on a salon wall. But all goes in the name of entertainment.

There are some gems too. The part where a character attributes India's population to Shimla (a honeymooning destination) is funny, as are most of Bittoo's conversations.

Now, the central flaw is the improbability of the film's central plot - both in terms of the romance and Bittoo's career graph. It is highly unlikely that an educated, upper middle-class girl would consider a wedding videographer as having relationship potential.

Creative license can be granted here, except that the film fails to convince the viewer of their compatibility. At best, they come across as distant friends.

Secondly, the turn in the second half is highly unconvincing. The finale is a royal mess - cliched and over-ambitious.

The portrayal of the film's characters is singed with a moral high-ground. No one here is allowed to be a normal, flawed human being. Bittoo is border-line preachy, but the actor's talent and the film's clever writing make that somewhat endearing.

It is to debut actor Pulkit Samrat's credit that he plays the character's weakness as its strengths. Samrat is definitely the best thing in the movie, and a talent to watch out for.

Amita Pathak shows some spark, but has to make that cliched choice that heroines must made in Hindi films: choose between the rich jerk and the golden boy of a hero.

Ashok Pathak does a great job playing the hero's sleazy sidekick.

Debut writer-director Supavitra Babul conjures up a fairly breezy film that won't leave you bored, but won't have you spell-bound either. It's good enough for a single-time view, and that's largely for the unique premise and the deserving debut actor.

Certainly the best there is, this week.

Rating: 2.5 stars

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