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Kuku Mathur Ki Jhand Ho Gayi review: Innocent and fun

Movie:
Kuku Mathur Ki Jhand Ho Gayi
Director:
Aman Sachdeva
Cast:
Siddharth Gupta, Simran Kaur Mundi, Pallavi Batra
Avg user rating:

Don't go by the corny name and the misleading poster. In a time where smart titles and promos often lead to disappointing films, this one turns the trend on its head.

The film has a simple story, and refreshingly doesn't pretend otherwise. Kuku (Siddharth Gupta) and Ronnie (Ashish Juneja) are "calony" pals who spend time pretending to get high on fruit beer. They buy shoes from the neighbourhood store, where the shopkeeper convinces them of the original Nikki (Nike) tag. They're doofuses but adorable.

As Kuku struggles to get a college admission, he envies his friend who inherits his grandfather's garment shop and is "set". A watchman compares his own life to Kuku's impending future (both work jobs in the private sector). Things get worse.

Kuku gets a job as a gofer on a shooting set; a portion that has plenty of laughs. You see the overage hero chasing the heroine with a 'Like' sign and the song's lyrics go on about Facebook love. The heroine, riled that the hero's photo is bigger on the poster, insists on hearts detail around her face.

Some misunderstandings and a wily shakuni mama later, Kuku unfriends Ronnie and opens his own restaurant. But the restaurant has come at a cost that will be difficult for Kuku to pay up.

There has been a spate of 'The Delhi Film' in Bollywood off late. This is one such but it's genuine; it couldn't have been set anywhere else. The film shrugs off pretence and takes our Kuku and Ronnie's everyday conflicts very seriously. You go with the flow enjoying the Delhi flavour that seeps in and soaking in the interesting characters that often serve to worsen the situation.

And the most interesting of them all is the wily uncle (Amit Sial, superb) who suggests shortcut solutions (usually illegal and morally quotable) in his sure-footed, smooth manner.

Dialogue has the quintessential Delhi flavor with words like Calony (for colony) and kainth (good). You have a burly character tell a girl that, Aapka innocent bada strong hai. A car sticker says, 'Wahe Guru is my Commanding Officer.'

In a hilarious scene, you have a jagran with bhajan lyrics that go, Welcome maiyya and a bit of rap thrown in. There are Godmen that talk of faith served "hot and fresh." And the film has the cutest (yet profound in its own way) take on "enlightment" (enlightenment).

Siddharth Gupta and Ashish Juneja give consistent, earnest performances. Alok Chaturvedi shines in his role as the watchman, who plays an important part in the film's developments.

The film has some interesting songs including the rap number towards the end that wonders, Kya Punjabi Baug mein sirf Punjabi rehte hain?

Of course we've had an overkill of Delhi based films, and this film only prorogates all the cliches. Still, debut director Aman Sachdeva's film is full of innocence, charm and fun. A good option, especially if you're fond of this genre.

Rating: 3 stars

 

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