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Leader

Movie:
Leader
Director:
Sekhar Kammula
Cast:
Daggubati Rana, Richa Gangopadhyaya, Priya Anand, Subba Raju, Kota Sreenivasa Rao
Music:
Mickey J Mayor
Producer:
M Saravanan and MS Guhan
Avg user rating:
Sekhar Kammula’s film has released amidst huge expectations thanks to the debut of Daggupati Rana, the darling grandson of ace producer D Rama Naidu. He hits the marquee as the third generation hero from the Daggupati clan. Tall, sharp looks, confident body language... all these mattered for the young hero. However, the film turned into a celluloid utopia, gravely neglecting the gross realities. The director simply tried to rub his ideas as ideals on the audience.

Chief Minister Sanjeevayya (Suman) is assassinated in a blast, engineered by his rivals. He is succeeded by his young son Arjun Prasad (Rana). The political intrigues are new to him. Caught in the ugly game of his opponents to overthrow him, the young CM gets on a mind raking mission. A political baddie Dhanunjay (Subba Raju) and the CM’s uncle (father’s brother) (Kota) called as Peddayana too joins the bandwagon of the villains to unseat Arjun. However, the optimistic and yet impractical Arjun wants to amend the political system in its entirety. How did he face the villains? What is his modus operandi to realize his goal of transforming the state into a sort of Platonic Utopia? These facets form the intellectually dealt subject, away from the values of mass entertainment.

Rana has certainly lived up to the expectations of the audiences with his looks and thoroughly trained histrionics. His base voice is a major asset to his future. His dialogue delivery is fine and in tune, synchronism with the expressions. Richa Gangopadhyaya is glamorous and beautiful as well and she can expect a promising career in Telugu film industry. Priya Anand too is nice to watch on screen with pretty looks and good performance, though it was cut short to a few scenes.

The political opponent of the CM played by Subba Raju is powerful in his presence. Rao Ramesh, though with a small role, enlivened the mood in the theatre with a different show. Kota Srinivasa Rao, after a long gap, romped back with serious villainy, putting aside his comical forays. It gives a feel to the audience that Kota’s role was not etched out well. Udaya Bhanu’s item number strikes the audience like thunder, and it might well synch with the mass audience to some extent.

Sekhar Kammula tries to juxtapose the political degradation with the movement for the Independence. Just like any other film, the director concentrated on the much used and abused subject of rampant corruption. Like in Shivaji, the hero tries to pull out the black money from the very few in society for the general good. To a large extent, the director, who mostly dwelt on the love subjects, failed to bring the seriousness that is involved in making a politically volatile story. The influence of Ramgopal Varma’s Sarkar can be seen on Sekhar Kammula in certain scenes.

It would be disgusting for the crowds to watch Rana (as the son of the CM) walking down the roads like a common youth. The audiences would surmise that the hero would be like a YS Jagan or Nara Lokesh, but their expectation paled out into a mere ideal, which is too impractical to follow. Sekhar Kammula seems to have utterly failed in attaching the minimum dignity to a CM’s son.

The technical aspects of the film are highly impressive with superb cinematography, excellent music and terrific background score. The first half is gripping, giving some promising moments to the audience. But, the second half slips into monotony thanks to the slipshod treatment to the political subject.

Verdict: Average

 

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