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Sarvvam

Movie:
Sarvvam
Director:
Vishnu Vardhan
Cast:
Arya, Trisha, JD Chakravarthy, Indrajeet, Rohan
Music:
Yuvan Shankar Raja
Producer:
Ayngaran International Films Pvt Ltd
Avg user rating:
Like the curate's egg, Vishnu Vardhan's Sarvvam is good in parts. He has made the film with a wafer thin storyline, banking heavily on style and gloss.

Ayngaran International Films' Sarvvam does have its highs. It is a character-driven action thriller, with some romance thrown in during the first half.

Check out: Pictures from the sets, wallpapers, and more at the Sarrvam special

The five main characters are Karthik (Arya) a happy-go-lucky young architect, who falls head over heels with a beautiful doctor Sandhya (Trisha) after a mix-up at a Kart Racing track, a morose football coach Eashwar (JD Chakravarthy) who moves around with a deadly black Rottweiler dog, a software professional Naushad (Indrajeet) and his son Imman (Rohan).

Vishnu has tried to base the plot on the life of these five characters, and shows how fate plays an important role in the denouement. At interval point a freak accident brings the twist in the tale, and the second part is a cat-and-mouse game.

What works for the film big-time is cinematographer Nirav Shah's superb camera, using shadow and light to advantage, in never-seen-before locales. The hospital scenes are sparkling white. A glass-box song, Kaatrukullai... picturised against the green of Vagamon, the sandy beaches and blue sea of Goa and the Rajasthan desert, stands out. Yuvan's music and background score deserve a special mention. Manu Jagadh's art work, especially the abandoned church set inside the forest, looks real.

Thyagarajan's close combat action scenes in misty Munnar are spellbinding. At 2 hours and 23 minutes, this is the longest-running Vishnu film. Editor Sreekar Prasad could have trimmed it a bit in the second half.

One wishes the film was tightly structured as the plot becomes wobbly and meanders. The trouble is that Vishnu does not have a gripping story to say, and the main characters and their motives are haphazardly tied up, leading to a manipulated climax. The film holds you riveted in the first half due to the love-hate funny encounters between Arya and Trisha that turns into deep love.

Arya, with his carefree acting style and easygoing charm, contributes to the film's energy. The scenes where he expresses his love for Trisha are a laugh. Trisha looks beautiful, though we wish she had more screen space.

J D Chakravarthy, as the morose, unfriendly character, is wooden throughout and his motivation is not well etched.

At the same time, Vishnu has tried to make a different film, for which he should be appreciated. The film has style, and perhaps with a sharper execution he could have gone for the jugular.

On the whole, Sarvvam tries to rework the Kollywood commercial formula and emerges as a decent thriller. It is worth a look.

Verdict- Visual Treat

 

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