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Simha

Movie:
Simha
Director:
Boyapati Srinu
Cast:
Balakrishna, Nayanatara, Namita, Sneha Ullal, Brahmanandam
Music:
Chakri
Avg user rating:
Nandamuri Balakrishna’s much awaited film was released to a hysterical pitch all over the state. The line comes from Nandamuri family that – it is possible only for the Nandamuris to break or shake the records. After a gap of a decade, NBK has certainly proved that the adage is applicable to him.

Everybody thought that the film might a combination of the previous films of Balakrishna – Lakshmi Narasimha and Narasimha Naidu. But, after watching the film, the title has a close link with the story and screenplay itself. The dialogues of Balakrishna are so powerful that any lacuna on the part of the film’s technicalities would slip into the oblivion. His dare and dash in successfully handling the dual shades of his characterization would bring him big kudos.

College professor Sivannarayana (Balakrishna) would risk anything in his career to trample the injustice. His colleague (Namitha) falls in love with him. Simultaneously, his student Janaki (Sneha Ullal) too falls to the dare of her professor. A flash back soon reveals that she joins the college just to escape from the villains. At one juncture, Sivannarayana saves Janaki from the villains and he comes to know about one shaking truth. The enemy of both his father and that of Janaki’s is one and the same. Moreover, Janaki is none other than the daughter of his uncle. Who is the villain? What happened thirty years ago? These questions form the crux.

NBK played dual roles as father and son. However, ageing is clearly visible during close-up shots. Sneha Ullal is okay for looks but she still needs to improve her acting skills. Namitha played another glamorous role in the film. But she appeared quite bulky despite showing her oomph. KR Vijaya was truly grand in grandmother’s role and she lived in the character and did complete justice to it. Aditya Menon and Malayalam artiste Saikumar showed good screen presence. Rahman is okay as Balakrishna’s brother-in-law. Nayanatara, though had a very small role in the film, enlivened the mood in the theatres. Comedy by Krishna Bhagawan, Ali, Venumadhav is just average.

Simha is out and out a formulaic movie. The urge of director Boyapati Seenu can be clearly felt in the theatre when he showed Balakrishna in an extraordinary manner. The goal of both the hero and the director seemed to be one – to capture the elusive hit. Boyapati succeeded in giving the exact material for the fans of Balakrishna, while giving the same pinch to all the lovers of mass films. Though the film begins on a regular note akin to the previous films of Balakrishna, the trend soon changes and would take a twist in the middle.

The presentation of nativity and time factor that of thirty years ago was superb in the flashback episode. The background score is the lifeline of the music. Coming to the violence factor, the audience is given to a feel that the quantum of bloodshed could have been minimized. The stunts are electrifying. Editing is crisp. However, the comedy department lagged behind in the film, which at the same time is silhouetted with the powerful presence of the hero.

Verdict: Mass entertainer

 

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