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Singh Saab the Great is unfortunately not so great

Movie:
Singh Saab the Great
Director:
Anil Sharma
Cast:
Sunny Deol, Urvashi Rautela, Amrita Rao
Avg user rating:

Warning: The film is about Sunny Deol. The story is incidental.

We see the Deol trio - Sunny, Bobby and dad Dharamendra - boogying to a song that says, Daaru band kal se. Sunny Deol's Saranjit Singh is dancing with his child bride (who pairs a 57-year-old actor with a 19-year-old?!), and later we're subjected to some creepy sexy-time between the two.

Sunny Deol plays an honest collector in a small town who also runs his own justice court called Saranjit Ki Adalat. As a take-off on his famous Damini dialogue he thunders, Yahaan tareek nahin padti.

His steadfast ways bother the town's mafia king Bhudev (Prakash Raj). Describing himself as bhooton ka dev, their altercations have them exchanging smart-alecky dialogue with each other, and then proceeds to tragic consequences.

Saranjit wants revenge and returns as Singh Saab, a political activist of sorts who quotes Vivekanada with supporting music punches. But then, his thinking changes from badla to badlav (change and not revenge) and sets about settling scores with Bhudev in a different way. Heck, the two even enjoy a raunchy dance number together, after which Singh Saab 'Not So Great', proceeds to pick up the dancing girl in his arms.

Through this journey there are several songs that sound and look like each other, Saranjit's wife and sister getting attacked in unbearably melodramatic portions, and Sunny Deol picking up a jeep with one hand and then finishing off half-a-dozen baddies. Supporting him is a local journalist played by Amrita Rao.

Now this is directed by Anil Sharma (Gadar, The Hero, Veer) who has never been known for subtly putting across a point anyway. The thinking, story and direction are simplistic and old-school. It follows the predictable route of the righteous hero, gorgeous heroine, song-n-dance relief, melodrama, and action in the finale.

Sharma adds some style in the rain-drenched confrontational scenes, but sadly he repeats the rain and thunder in almost every key scene thereafter. There is no logical progression of time like the scene where hundreds of people collect for an impromptu protest even before Singh Saab can finish his preachy dialogue.

The dialogue has some crackling lines but an equal number that are in bad taste like the one where a character confuses the words immolation and molestation.

Prakash Raj with the hugely expressive, bulbous eyes still hasn't tired of playing the quasi-comical baddie, and to be honest, his is the most entertaining performance in the movie. This character, which is ruthless but sensitive enough to notice his daughter's untied shoelaces, makes for a formidable villain. So interesting is the character and Raj's performance that it would have totally stolen the hero's thunder, had it not been for Sunny Deol.

Indeed, Sunny Deol though plays on his forte shouting out the dialogue with conviction and emotion, and making the character's superhuman strength look somewhat believable.

For those who want to relive old-school melodrama, and consider themselves as Sunny Deol fans, there are no surprises in store. But then, that's exactly what you signed up for.

Rating: 1.5 stars

 

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