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AP Sportlight

Source : AP
Last Updated: Fri, Jun 15, 2012 22:45 hrs

<>1954 — Rocky Marciano scores a 15-round unanimous decision over Ezzard Charles at New York to retain the world heavyweight title.

1961 — Gene Littler shoots a 68 in the final round to edge Doug Sanders and Bob Goalby in the U.S. Open.

1962 — Jack Nicklaus beats Arnold Palmer by three strokes in a playoff to win the U.S. Open.

1973 — John Miller shoots a 63 in the final round to win the U.S. Open over John Schlee.

1976 — The 18-team NBA absorbs four of the six remaining ABA teams: the New York Nets, Indiana Pacers, San Antonio Spurs and Denver Nuggets.

1979 — Hale Irwin wins the U.S. Open over Gary Player and Jerry Pate.

1990 — Harry Gant, 55, becomes the oldest driver to win a NASCAR race with a 2.4-second victory over Rusty Wallace in the Miller 500 at Pocono International Raceway.

1991 — Payne Stewart escapes with a two-stroke victory over Scott Simpson in the highest-scoring U.S. Open playoff in 64 years.

1995 — Claude Lemieux snaps a tie at 3:17 of the third period as the New Jersey Devils open the Stanley Cup finals with a 2-1 victory over the Detroit Red Wings. The victory, the ninth on the road, breaks the NHL playoff record for road wins.

2001 — Retief Goosen misses a 2-foot putt on the 18th green, tying him with Mark Brooks and setting up a playoff for the U.S. Open.

2006 — Rookie David Gilliland becomes the first non-Nextel Cup driver to win a Busch Series race this season, passing J.J. Yeley with 10 laps to go and holding on to take the Meijer 300 at Kentucky Speedway.

2007 — Angel Cabrera holds off Tiger Woods and Jim Furyk by a stroke to capture the U.S. Open. Cabrera shoots a 1-under 69 in the final round at brutal Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club.

2007 — Kate Ziegler breaks swimming's oldest world record, shattering the 1,500-meter freestyle mark by more than 9 seconds at the TYR Meet of Champions Mission Viejo, Calif. Ziegler wins the 30-lap race in 15:42.54, easily erasing Janet Evans' 1988 mark of 15:52.10 set in Orlando, Fla. At the time, Evans was the first woman to break 16 minutes.

2008 — The Boston Celtics win their 17th NBA title with a stunning 131-92 blowout over the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 6. Kevin Garnett scores 26 points with 14 rebounds, Ray Allen scores 26 and Paul Pierce, the finals MVP, adds 17. The Celtics, a 24-win team a year ago, wrap up their first crown since 1986.

2010 — The University of Utah accepts an invitation to become the 12th member of the newly expanded Pac-10 conference.

2010 — The Los Angeles Lakers beat Boston for the first time in a Game 7 to repeat as NBA champions. Kobe Bryant scores 23 points despite 6-of-24 shooting and the Lakers win their 16th NBA championship, dramatically rallying from a fourth-quarter 13-point deficit to beat the Celtics 83-79.

1910 — Alex Smith wins the U.S. Open by beating John McDermont and Macdonald Smith in an 18-hole playoff. Smith beats McDermont by four strokes and Macdonald Smith by six.

1921 — The University of Illinois wins the first NCAA track and field championships with 20 1/4 points. Notre Dame finishes second with 16 3/4 points.

1941 — Joe Louis knocks out Billy Conn in the 13th round at the Polo Grounds in New York to retain the world heavyweight title.

1960 — Arnold Palmer beats amateur Jack Nicklaus by two strokes to win the U.S. Open.

1967 — Jack Nicklaus shoots a record 275 to beat Arnold Palmer for the U.S. Open. Nicklaus breaks Ben Hogan's 1948 record by one stroke.

1972 — Jack Nicklaus wins the U.S. Open by three strokes over Bruce Crampton and ties Bobby Jones' record of 13 major titles.

1984 — Fuzzy Zoeller shoots a 3-under 67 to beat Greg Norman by eight strokes in the 18-hole playoff for the U.S. Open title.

1986 — California's Don Sutton becomes the 19th pitcher in baseball history to win 300 games as he pitches a three-hitter to give the Angels a 5-1 triumph over the Texas Rangers.

1990 — Hale Irwin makes an 8-foot birdie putt on the 91st hole to beat Mike Donald in the first sudden-death playoff to decide the U.S. Open. It is the third U.S. Open title for the 45-year-old Irwin, the oldest winner in the tournament's history.

1995 — Michael Johnson becomes the first national champion at 200 and 400 meters since 1899 when he captures both races at the USA-Mobil Championships.

2000 — Tiger Woods turns the 100th U.S. Open into a one-man show, winning by 15 strokes over Ernie Els and Miguel Angel Jimenez. Woods' 15-stroke margin shatters the Open mark of 11 set by Willie Smith in 1899 and is the largest in any major championship — surpassing the 13-stroke victory by Old Tom Morris in the 1862 British Open.

2006 — Phil Mickelson's bid for a third consecutive major ends with a shocking collapse when he bungles his way to a double bogey on the final hole, giving the U.S. Open to Geoff Ogilvy.

1867 — Ruthless, ridden by J. Gilpatrick, wins the inaugural Belmont Stakes at Jerome Park in the Bronx. The filly earns $1,850 for her victory.

1914 — Harry Vardon wins his sixth and final British Open by shooting a 306, three strokes ahead of J.H. Taylor at Prestwick Club.

1936 — German heavyweight Max Schmeling knocks out previously unbeaten Joe Louis in the 12th round. Schmeling's victory sets off a propaganda war between the Nazi regime and the United States.

1954 — Ed Furgol edges Gene Littler by one stroke to win the U.S. Open, the first golf tournament to be televised nationally.

1955 — Jack Fleck beats Ben Hogan by three strokes in a playoff round to win the U.S. Open.

1977 — Hubert Green wins the U.S. Open by one stroke over Lou Graham.

1986 — Len Bias, the second pick in the NBA draft made by the Boston Celtics two days before, dies of a heart attack induced by cocaine use.

1992 — Evander Holyfield wins a unanimous decision over Larry Holmes to remain unbeaten and retain the undisputed heavyweight title.

1999 — Dallas wins its first Stanley Cup, as Brett Hull's controversial goal at 14:51 of the third overtime gives the Stars a 2-1 victory over the Buffalo Sabres in Game 6.

2005 — Michael Campbell answers every challenge Tiger Woods throws his way for a two-shot victory in the U.S. Open. Campbell has clutch par saves and a 20-foot birdie putt on the 17th hole that proves to be the knockout punch. Retief Goosen, the two-time U.S. Open champion, turns in a collapse that ranks among the greatest in major championship history. He loses his three-shot lead in three holes and closes with an 81 to tie for 11th at 8 over.

2005 — Michelin advises the 14 cars it supplies that its tires are unsafe for the final banked turn for the Formula One race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Unable to forge a compromise, all 14 Michelin teams duck off the track after the warmup lap, leaving winner Michael Schumacher and the five other drivers who use Bridgestone tires to race among themselves.

2006 — Cam Ward stops nearly everything giving the Carolina Hurricanes their first Stanley Cup title with a 3-1 victory over Edmonton in Game 7. Aaron Ward and Frantisek Kaberle, each six-goal scorers during the regular season, score goals for the Hurricanes.

1936 — Jesse Owens sets a 100-meter record of 10.2 seconds at a meet in Chicago.

1940 — Joe Louis stops Arturo Godoy in the eighth round at Yankee Stadium to retain the world heavyweight title.

1960 — Floyd Patterson knocks out Ingemar Johansson in the fifth round in New York to become the first boxer to regain the world heavyweight title.

1964 — Ken Venturi beats Tommy Jacobs by two strokes to win the U.S. Open.

1966 — Billy Casper beats Arnold Palmer by four strokes in a playoff to win the U.S. Open.

1968 — The Night of Speed. In a span of 2 1/2 hours, the world record of 10 seconds for the 100 meters is broken by three men and tied by seven others at the AAU Track and Field Championships in Sacramento, Calif. Jim Hines wins the first semifinal in a tight finish with Ronny Ray Smith, becoming the first man to break the 10-second barrier. Both runners are credited with a time of 9.9 seconds. Charlie Greene wins the second semifinal and then ties Hines' 9.9 record in the final.

1976 — Jerry Pate, 22, wins the U.S. Open by two strokes over Al Geiberger and Tom Weiskopf.

1980 — Roberto Duran wins a 15-round decision over Sugar Ray Leonard in Montreal to win the world welterweight crown.

1982 — Tom Watson wins the U.S. Open by two strokes over Jack Nicklaus.

1984 — Jockey Pat Day equals a thoroughbred racing record for an eight-race card when he wins seven races at Churchill Downs. Day's only loss is in the fourth race.

1987 — Scott Simpson, with a final-round 2-under 68, beats Tom Watson by one stroke to win the U.S. Open.

1987 — The Dallas Sidekicks win the MISL title with a 4-3 overtime victory in the seventh game over the Tacoma Stars.

1993 — Lee Janzen holes a 30-foot chip for birdie on No. 16 and adds birdies on the par-5 closing holes for a two-stroke victory over Payne Stewart in the U.S. Open. Janzen ties Jack Nicklaus' record 272 total and Lee Trevino's four straight rounds in the 60's.

1993 — John Paxson hits a 3-pointer with 3.9 seconds left as the Chicago Bulls win their third consecutive NBA title with a 99-98 victory over the Phoenix Suns in Game 6 of the finals.

1994 — Ernie Els of South Africa becomes the first foreign winner of the U.S. Open since 1981, beating Loren Roberts on the second playoff hole.

2004 — Retief Goosen captures his second U.S. Open in four years. In the toughest final round at the U.S. Open in 22 years, Goosen closes with a 1-over 71 for a two-shot victory made possible when Phil Mickelson three-putts from 5 feet on the 17th.

2004 — Ken Griffey Jr. hits the 500th home run of his career, off Matt Morris, to help the Cincinnati Reds beat the St. Louis Cardinals 6-0.

2006 — Dwyane Wade caps his magnificent playoffs with 36 points and 10 rebounds to lead Miami past the Dallas Mavericks 95-92 as the Heat roar back from a two-game deficit to win the NBA finals in six games.

2009 — Wladimir Klitschko shows his dominance of the heavyweight division, stopping Ruslan Chagaev in the 10th round of a title fight before 61,000 fans at a German soccer stadium in Gelsenkirchen. The IBF and WBO champion adds the Ring Magazine belt to his haul.

2010 — Graeme McDowell of Northern Ireland wins the U.S. Open, holding off France's Gregory Havret to become the first European to win America's national championship since 1970.

1919 — Hazel Hotchkiss Wightman wins the women's U.S. Lawn Tennis Association championship with a 6-1, 6-2 victory over Marion Zinderstein.

1932 — Jack Sharkey scores a 15-round split decision over Max Schmeling to win the world heavyweight title in New York.

1960 — Armin Hary of West Germany becomes the first man to run 100 meters in 10.0 seconds at a meet in Zurich, Switzerland.

1964 — Jim Bunning of the Philadelphia Phillies pitches a perfect game against the New York Mets. The no-hitter gives Bunning one in each league and the Phillies' Gus Triandos becomes the first catcher to handle no-hitters in both leagues.

1965 — Gary Player becomes the third man to win golf's top four pro titles when he captures the U.S. Open. Player beats Kel Nagle by three strokes in a playoff round. Gene Sarazen and Ben Hogan had won the U.S. and British Opens, the Masters and the PGA.

1970 — Britain's Tony Jacklin becomes the first English golfer in 50 years to win the U.S. Open, beating Dave Hill by five strokes.

1971 — Lee Trevino beats Jack Nicklaus by two strokes in a playoff to win the U.S. Open.

1992 — Tom Kite wins the U.S. Open by two strokes over Jeff Sluman. Playing in 35 mph winds, Kite shoots a par 72 for a 3-under 285 total.

1994 — Lori McNeil upsets five-time champion Steffi Graf 7-5, 7-6 (7-5) in the first round of Wimbledon. Graf becomes the first reigning women's champion to lose in the first round.

1998 — Marion Jones becomes the first athlete in 50 years to win the women's 100 and 200 meters and long jump at the U.S. Track and Field Championships. Jones wins the 200 in 22.24 seconds.

2002 — Lance Deal wins his ninth U.S. hammer championship. He joins Hal Connolly as the only nine-time winners in the event. Deal's winning throw of 244 feet, 5 inches is the shortest of any of his winning efforts at the U.S. Track and Field Championships.

2003 — Lennox Lewis retains his heavyweight title when a cut stops Vitali Klitschko after six brawling rounds. All three ringside judges had Klitschko winning 58-56, but ring doctor Paul Wallace orders referee Lou Moret to stop the fight.

2005 — French Open winner Justine Henin-Hardenne loses in the first round at Wimbledon. The Belgian becomes the first Roland Garros women's champion since 1962 to lose her opening match at Wimbledon when she's beaten by Eleni Daniilidou of Greece, 7-6 (8), 2-6, 7-5.

2005 — Detroit, led by Chauncey Billups' 21 points, forces Game 7 of the NBA finals with a 95-86 victory at San Antonio. The Pistons become the first road team to win Game 6 of the NBA finals since the 2-3-2 format was implemented in 1985.

2007 — Peter Wessels, a Dutch qualifier ranked 488th, beats top-seeded Tommy Robredo 6-3, 6-3 to advance to the semifinals of the Ordina Open in Den Bosch, Netherlands.

1918 — Molla Bjurstedt wins the women's U.S. Lawn Tennis Association title for the fourth straight year, 6-4, 6-3 over Eleanor Goss.

1937 — Joe Louis knocks out Jim Braddock in the eighth round at Chicago's Comiskey Park to win the world heavyweight title, which he would hold for 11 years.

1938 — In a rematch portrayed in both countries as good vs. evil, Joe Louis knocks out Germany's Max Schmeling at 2:04 of the first round at Yankee Stadium to retain the world heavyweight title.

1949 — Ezzard Charles scores a 15-round unanimous decision over Jersey Joe Walcott at Comiskey Park in Chicago to win the vacant world heavyweight title.

1979 — Larry Holmes stops Mike Weaver in the 12th round to retain the WBC heavyweight title at Madison Square Garden in New York.

1994 — The Houston Rockets, led by Hakeem Olajuwon, win their first NBA title, beating New York 90-84 in Game 7 of the finals. Olajuwon gets 25 points, 10 rebounds, seven assists and three blocks.

1996 — Michael Moorer regains the IBF heavyweight title from Axel Schulz on a split decision in Frankfurt, Germany.

1999 — In one of the greatest upsets in Wimbledon's 113-year history, top-ranked Martina Hingis loses 6-2, 6-0 in the opening round to Jelena Dokic, a 16-year-old qualifier ranked 129th.

2001 — Karrie Webb sets two scoring records at the LPGA Championship in shooting a 7-under 64 for a three-stroke lead. Webb, at 11-under 131, breaks the 36-hole scoring record by two strokes. She also shoots a 29 on the front nine for the lowest nine-hole score in the 47-year history of the championship.

2006 — The United States soccer team is eliminated from World Cup play with a 2-1 loss to Ghana.

2007 — For the first time, Americans are taken with the top two picks in the NHL draft. Chicago selects Patrick Kane with the first pick. Philadelphia then selects left wing James vanRiemsdyk with the second pick.

2009 — Lucas Glover wins the U.S. Open at Bethpage Black, finishing with a final round of 3-over 73 to win by two strokes over Phil Mickelson, David Duval and Ricky Barnes.

2010 — Dino Ciccarelli, Cammi Granato, Angela James are elected to Hockey Hall of Fame as players. In the Builder Category, Jimmy Devellano and the late Daryl "Doc" Seaman get elected.

2010 — South Africa becomes the first host nation not to advance in 80 years of World Cup play. The host nation does beat France 2-1 in its final game, but they needed a big win to have any chance of moving on from Group A.

1917 — In baseball's greatest relief effort, Ernie Shore of the Boston Red Sox retires all 26 batters for a 4-0 victory over Washington. Shore relieves Babe Ruth with nobody out and a man on first, who was cut down stealing.

1917 — Molla Bjurstedt win the women's U.S. Lawn Tennis Association title for the third straight year with a 4-6, 6-0, 6-2 victory over Marion Vanderhoef.

1963 — Julius Boros wins a three-way playoff to take the U.S. Open. Boros beats Jacky Cupit by three strokes and Arnold Palmer by six.

1969 — Joe Frazier stops Jerry Quarry in the eighth round at Madison Square Garden in New York for the world heavyweight title.

1972 — President Nixon signs the Higher Education Act of 1972. Title IX of this congressional act bars sex bias in athletics and other activities at colleges receiving federal assistance.

1974 — Sandra Haynie wins the LPGA championship by two strokes over JoAnne Carner.

1975 — Lou Graham beats John Mahaffey by two strokes in a playoff to win the U.S. Open.

1991 — A Mazda becomes the first Japanese car to win the Le Mans 24 hours race, overtaking a Mercedes in the last three hours. Bertrand Gachot of Belgium, Johnny Herbert of Britain and Volker Weidler of Germany are the winning drivers of the rotary-powered Mazda.

1996 — Michael Johnson breaks the world record in the men's 200 meters in 19.66 seconds at the U.S. track and field trials in Atlanta. The previous mark of 19.72 was set by Italy's Pietro Mennea in 1979 in Mexico City.

2002 — Hall of Fame jockey Chris McCarron finishes his career with his 7,141st trip to the winner's circle, his final ride a victory on Came Home in the $107,500 Affirmed Stakes.

2005 — Tim Duncan comes up huge in the second half and is chosen finals MVP and Manu Ginobili has another breakthrough performance to lead the San Antonio Spurs past the Detroit Pistons 81-74 in Game 7 of the NBA finals.

2009 — Steve Yzerman, Brett Hull, Luc Robitaille and Brian Leetch are elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame. All were eligible for the first time. New Jersey Devils president Lou Lamoriello is also elected in the builder category.

2010 — Henrik Sedin of the Vancouver Canucks captures the Hart Trophy, wrecking Alex Ovechkin's bid for an NHL MVP three-peat. Sedin, who had a league-best 83 assists, has 894 total points compared with 834 for Washington's Ovechkin. Ryan Miller of the Buffalo Sabres wins the Vezina Trophy as the NHL's top goaltender.

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