Gene used by bacteria to breach plant defences identified

Source : ANI
Last Updated: Fri, Mar 04, 2011 11:50 hrs

Scientists have identified the gene used by some infectious bacteria to breach defensive natural products produced by plants.

Plants are able to protect themselves from most bacteria, but some bacteria are able to breach their defences.

"Microbes only become pathogens when they find a way to infect a host and overwhelm the host defences," said lead author Jun Fan from the John Innes Centre on the Norwich Research Park.

"Our findings answer some important questions about host-pathogen biology," he added.

Scientists have confirmed that the chemicals used by cruciferous plants to defend against bacteria are isothiocyanates, nitrogen and sulphur-containing organic compounds produced by plants of the mustard family, such as cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts.

These potent molecules have antioxidant, anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties in humans.

The plant releases isothiocyanates when it is challenged or eaten. They had previously been shown to be active against bacteria but this is the first time their essential role has been successfully tested using real plants.

Without this class of compounds, crucifers would be more vulnerable to disease from a much wider variety of bacteria.

Isothiocyanates also provide a chemical barrier to harmful fungi and a toxic defence warning to insects and other herbivores.

Scientists from JIC and the University of Edinburgh found that bacterial pathogens carrying the sax genes, thought to be involved in detoxification and removal of isothiocyanates, were able to overcome these defences.

Understanding how some bacterial strains become specialised to overcome plant resistance will help scientists identify new ways to improve crop plants.

"These discoveries have a broader significance for current efforts to increase food security," said co-author Dr Peter Doerner from Edinburgh University.

The study has been published in Science. (ANI)




More from Sify: