Google doodles for Ada Lovelace

Source : IBNS
Last Updated: Mon, Dec 10, 2012 16:59 hrs
Google doodles for Ada Lovelace

Popular search engine Google on Monday decorated its homepage with a beautiful doodle celebrating world's first computer programmer Ada Lovelace's 197th birthday.

One could see the evolution of computers in the latest doodle.

Netizens could see Ada Lovelace sitting on a desk and writing her computer program with a quill pen. The paper on which she is writing her program twirls in the form of the letters of the word ´Google´ logo.

One could also see antique computer machines to present day laptops in the doodle.

Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, born as Augusta Ada Byron and now commonly known as Ada Lovelace, was born on Dec 10, 1815 in England.

Ada is often considered as the world´s first computer programmer.

The English mathematician and writer was chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage´s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine.

Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine.

Ada was the only legitimate child of the poet Lord Byron.

As a young adult, she took an interest in mathematics, and in particular Babbage´s work on the analytical engine.

Between 1842 and 1843, she translated an article by Italian mathematician Luigi Menabrea on the engine, which she supplemented with a set of notes of her own.

These notes contain what is considered the first computer program. Ada´s notes are important in the early history of computers.

She also foresaw the capability of computers to go beyond mere calculating or number-crunching while others, including Babbage himself, focused only on these capabilities.

Ada died at the age of 36 on Nov 27, 1852 of uterine cancer.

From Charlie Chaplin to Marie Curie, Google doodles have not only celebrated the birth anniversaries of great personalities, they have also made internet users know about important dates through the designs and animation.

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