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'Vedanta and yoga perfect match for certain American values'

Source : IANS
Last Updated: Sun, Jan 09, 2011 04:40 hrs

Chicago, Jan 9 (IANS) There has always been a pervasive but undocumented feeling that Indian philosophy, as manifest in Vedanta on the intellectual plain and yoga on the physical plain, has very significantly influenced the West in general and America in particular. That feeling now finds a meticulously constructed scholastic endorsement in the form of an important new book.

Author Philip Goldberg's 'American Veda - From Emerson to the Beatles to Yoga and Meditation, How Indian Spirituality Changed the West' (Harmony Books, 398 pages, $26) offers a comprehensive account of the inroads made by Indian philosophy since the early 19th century.

'The combination of Vedanta and Yoga was a perfect match for certain American values: freedom of choice and religion, individuality, scientific rationality, and pragmatism. They appealed especially to well-educated Americans who were discontent with ordinary religion and unsatisfied by secularism, giving them a way to be authentically spiritual without compromising their sense of reason, their consciences or their personal inclinations,' Goldberg told IANS in an interview.

He said Indian teachers who came to the US were conscious of the openness of American society and they adapted the teachings accordingly.

Explaining the mainstreaming of Indian philosophy in the US, Goldberg said, 'I think the remarkable growth of the 'spiritual but not religious' cohort of Americans would have been unthinkable without access to the practices derived from Hinduism and Buddhism. In addition, the philosophy was presented so rationally that its premises could be regarded as hypotheses, and the practices were so uniform and so widely applicable that they lent themselves to scientific experimentation.'

The book begins with a claim that is deliberately designed to be an attention grabber. 'In February 1968 the Beatles went to India for an extended stay with their new guru, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It may have been the most momentous spiritual retreat since Jesus spent those 40 days in the wilderness. The media frenzy over the Fab Four made known to the sleek, sophisticated West that meek, mysterious India had something of value. Our understanding and practice of spirituality would never be the same,' Goldberg writes.

He points out that translated Hindu texts were very much a part of the libraries of John Adams, the second president of the United States and one of its most respected statesmen and political theorists, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, an eminent poet and essayist who led the transcendentalist movement in the mid-19th century. From there those ideas permeated to author and philosopher Henry David Thoreau and poet Walt Whitman among others.

In recounting Thoreau's perspective about the Bhagavad Gita, Goldberg refers to a much quoted passage from the book Walden. Thoreau writes, 'In the morning I bathe my intellect in the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy of the Bhagavad Gita, since whose composition years of the gods have elapsed, and in comparison with which our modern world and its literature seems puny and trivial.'

The book has two distinct trends in support of the author's primary contention about how Indian spirituality changed the West. One trend is at the operational level where words such as mantra, guru, karma and pundits have so seamlessly become part of the mainstream lexicon. The other trend is much deeper in terms of internalising the core values of Indian philosophy. Asked if the people in the US are conscious of this, Goldberg said, 'Some are conscious of it, and therefore grateful to the Indian legacy. Others are not: it's seeped into the American consciousness in subtle but profound ways.'

Goldberg also talks about the 'Vedization of America'. On whether it can be attributed to the general secularisation/pluralisation significantly caused by the rise of agnostic information technologies, he said, 'If you mean, could the trends I describe be attributed to the growth of pluralism and other social forces, independent of the Indian influence, it is very hard to say. Certainly, the combination of factors made for a perfect storm. I tend to think that the experiential practices of meditation and yoga, and the intellectual framework of Vedanta, accelerated, deepened and broadened what might have been an inevitable but amorphous evolution.'

On whether he apprehends any organized backlash or pushback against Indian philosophy, he said 'Not a big one, but some of it is inevitable. There has always been a backlash from both mainstream religion - conservative Christians in particular - and the anti-religious left. Vivekananda faced up to it in 1893, and all the important gurus were confronted by it. Right now, there's an anti-yoga campaign by some Christian preachers. I'd be very pleased if my book becomes a lightning rod for such a controversy. Bring 'em on!'

On a movement in support of a 'Christian yoga' that may be gaining some ground Goldberg said, 'That's a more complicated issue than is often realised. The question, 'Is yoga a form of Hinduism' depends entirely on how one defines both yoga and Hinduism. That there are people teaching Christian Yoga and Jewish Yoga strikes me as a backhanded compliment to one of the great glories of the Vedic tradition: its universality and adaptability. That having been said, the idea that yoga is 'a Hindu tool,' i.e., a form of stealth conversion, strikes me as a projection by Christians of their own messianic drive to convert the 'heathen'. That conversion is not in the Hindu repertoire - and that the gurus and swamis and yoga masters are content to have their students become better Christians - is hard for many to comprehend.'

(Mayank Chhaya is a US-based writer and commentator. He can be contacted at m@mayankchhaya.net)




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