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Love Sex Aur Dhokha review: Pop this in!

Love Sex Aur Dhokha review: Pop this in!

Source: Sify

By: Sonia Chopra

Critic's Rating: 17/5

Friday 19 March 2010

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Movie Title

Love Sex Aur Dhokha

Director

Dibakar Banerjee

Star Cast

Anshuman Jha, Shruti, Raj Kumar Yadav, Neha Chauhan

Let?s not call this film 'bold' ? an inadequate adjective that has come to define the film through its general buzz. Incorporating difficult subjects like honour killings and sexual exploitation? LSD is, at several times, an unpalatable watch.

The violence creeps in so unexpectedly in the first half ? the film?s promos haven?t prepared you for it?you?ll find your intermission break not very appetising. By the way, these are exactly the elements that make the film a must-watch.

In a recent media conference, writer-director Anurag Kashyap questioned the meaning of entertainment. He stated that we wrongly branded only happy films to be entertaining, explaining the need for including any film that engaged you into the definition. It?s hard to argue this point.

Divided into three sections, Love Sex Aur Dhokha isn?t really all that controversial. It?s a sweet film, actually; trying to root for the underdogs whether in love or work life. The first portion is about a couple in love? a student directing his diploma film and the amateur actress. She belongs to a family where misogyny in the men is innate. This is the story that is also designed for most laughs. Most of the time, it?s not really humorous. The diploma film is a take-off on a Bollywood blockbuster, and the viewer can laugh only so many times at the actors overdoing their performances.

Known for men who spout filthy cuss words in every sentence, the dialogues are remarkably authentic. The second track is inspired by the numerous MMS stories one hears about; all heartbreaking sad. Here, a character you grow fond of through the movie, is exploited by the lover, selling their lovemaking session for an easy buck.

The third track is the lightest one ? a Punjabi pop-star (modelled after Mika; how delightfully clever) who gets embroiled in his own womanising web thanks to a sting camera operation.

All three are nice, complex stories; neatly fleshed out; and commenting on something terribly wrong with our society. Largely, it?s speaking for women who become victims of sexual exploitation and a deep misogyny that leads their own families to disown them. However, writer-director Dibakar Banerjee hasn?t been able to portray female characters as anything apart from victims, save one instance where it?s the stark opposite: a dictatorial editor.

The film is a slap of reality and a comment on the misuse of technology. Banerjee?s (Khosla ka Ghosla, Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye!) tone is loud; texture, delightfully kitschy. He narrates the story in a non-linear fashion, hooking up the three tales eventually. It?s a strategy that filmmakers usually overuse while telling more than one story, but here the connection forms a more solid relevance. The camera, a character in its own right, irritates and provocates the audience with its constant presence.

Camerawork (many shots have been executed by the actors themselves) reminds you of the Blair Witch Project with its deliberately clumsy, real, always-probing shooting. Nikos Andritsakis?s camera is constantly mobile, even taking a dip underwater in a neatly executed scene.

Performances are flawless ? it?s impossible not to be moved by the stories and that?s largely due to spot-on rendering by the cast. Technically, like all of Banerjee?s films, LSD triumphs. Urmi Juverkar?s (Oye Lucky!...) story is timely, ruthless and sweet. Namrata Rao?s editing (Ishqiya) is masterful, Sneha Khanwalkar?s music (Oye Lucky!...) is fun, though not as memorable as her first film.

So you have a film comprising elements its title aptly pronounces. Savour these stories told in a distinct edgy, kitschy style. Don?t miss..

Verdict: 3.5 stars

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