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'Traffic' review: The scope of human compassion!

'Traffic' review: The scope of human compassion!

Source: Sify

By: Sonia Chopra

Friday 6 May 2016

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Movie Title

Traffic

Director

Rajesh Pillai

Star Cast

Manoj Bajpayee, Jimmy Shergill, Divya Dutta

The best part about the film is that is showcases humanity at its most compassionate, and it is beyond moving to witness the scope of human kindness and spirit.

Imagine this scenario: a young boy having met with an accident is in the hospital with very little hope. His parents, already agonized, are faced with the biggest dilemma imaginable.

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They've had a strange request from another set of parents. That of donating their son's heart to their 12-year-old daughter, who must have a transplant within a few hours to live. How does a parent give up that last bit of hope and agree to this request? Then again, a decision must be made, for that girl's life depends on it.

Then there is the other practical issue of how to transport the heart from Mumbai to Pune by road in a couple of hours during peak hour. Having made the decision, therein starts a full-blown mission involving politicians, the traffic commissioner, a top actor and the entire traffic police at service to save that one life.

The first instance of human compassion comes in the form of the boy's parents, who agree to donate their dying son's heart. Then, the doctors who do everything to make the heart transplant a success. The commissioner (Jimmy Shergill) who agrees to put his entire force on duty, to make sure the organ reaches the Pune hospital within the designated time, and the constable Ramdas (Manoj Bajpayee), who takes it upon himself to drive the organ safely and swiftly to its destination.

The task is not as easy as it seems. Despite the traffic being blocked for the vehicle, Ramdas has to drive at top speed for the car to reach on time. Unexpected troubles crop up. Like one of the passengers in the car, the most unexpected one, turning out to be their biggest roadblock.

The car, which is being tracked every second disappears, as the befuddled traffic cops in the control room, cannot figure out where it went. With every second being important, this is a huge setback.

This and more adventures lie ahead, as the van makes its perilous journey.

Late director Rajesh Pillai brings alive a topic that deserves to be known. The veteran cast does exceedingly well. Manoj Bajpayee shines as the traffic constable who was suspended for taking bribes, but redeems himself with this act of courage.

Sachin Khedekar and Kitu Gidwani are excellent as the parents faced with an impossible dilemma. Prosenjit Chatterjee plays the father of the girl in need of the organ transplant. His daughter lying on the hospital bed has him regret all the moments he chose to be at work rather than spending time with her. Divya Dutta, as the girl's mother, has some of the film's most powerful scenes. It is interesting that while the father thinks his power and fame will turn things around, it is the mother's heart-to-heart plea that actually resonates with the organ donor parents. Jimmy Shergill is marvelous as the initially-reluctant traffic commissioner who finally gives in and makes the mission his own.

The film's tells the story in a straightforward, simple manner. The execution is not sharp and technically impressive. The acting is superb by the veterans, but shaky by the younger crowd. Still, the film is worth a watch for the extraordinary story. A story that actually encompasses the scope of human kindness. And the fact that the film is inspired by true events makes it that much special!